Students at 4-year CT colleges graduate at a high rate

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Students who attend four-year colleges in Connecticut graduate at higher rates than those in most other states.

From 2009 to 2015, nearly three out of four students who enrolled in Connecticut public colleges graduated within six years, according to a study from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. That puts the state in fifth place.

Connecticut ranks second for rate of graduation from four-year private schools with a rate of almost 85 percent. It placed just a half a percentage point behind Rhode Island.

Nationally, the college completion rate for students who started in four-year public institutions declined from 2008 to 2009 by 1.7 percentage points, dropping to 61.2 percent from 62.9 percent. Connecticut was one of the 15 states where the college completion rate increased.

Connecticut rated much lower in completion rates at two-year public institutions, ranking 33rd among the states.

Browse below for completion rate and rankings by state. Or visit the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center for more-detailed information on rates for part-time, first-time-in-college students, or by gender.

College completion rates by state from 2009 to 2015.
Six-year completion rates for students who started at four-year public and private schools and two-year public schools. States with fewer than three category institutions are excluded.
State 4-year public 4-year private 2-year public 4-year public rank 4-year private rank 2-year public rank
Alabama 58.23% 56.96% 31 36
Alaska
Arizona 68.51% 15
Arkansas 50.84% 69.94% 38.89% 39 25 18
California 70.07% 77.08% 30.11% 12 11 36
Colorado 60.93% 72.8% 38.03% 24 17 22
Connecticut 73.99% 84.72% 34.19% 5 2 33
Delaware 40.97% 38
District of Columbia 84.52% 3
Florida 54.3% 67.31% 51.54% 37 28 4
Georgia 60.04% 70.49% 36.09% 27 22 29
Hawaii 55.53% 36.78% 35 28
Idaho 43.88% 36.09% 42 29
Illinois 72.44% 74.89% 44.52% 8 15 12
Indiana 75.8% 23.15% 14 37
Iowa 80.73% 71.94% 45.32% 1 19 8
Kansas 62.68% 45.34% 19 7
Kentucky 57.29% 63.25% 39.58% 32 30 17
Louisiana 56.39% 34
Maine 52.3% 78.7% 43.4% 38 10 14
Maryland 60.63% 83.61% 37.36% 26 4 25
Massachusetts 68.81% 81.4% 37.47% 14 7 23
Michigan 69.41% 35.13% 13 32
Minnesota 72.12% 79.08% 54.5% 9 8 3
Mississippi 61.21% 43.57% 22 13
Missouri 62.18% 62.29% 37.02% 21 32 27
Montana 48.69% 61.71% 45.83% 40 33 6
Nebraska 63.89% 61.6% 41.96% 17 34 15
Nevada 29.02% 45
New Hampshire 78.51% 76.57% 2 12
New Jersey 73.7% 71.41% 36.07% 6 21 31
New Mexico 44.31% 41
New York 62.86% 76.23% 41.85% 18 13 16
North Carolina 70.82% 72.24% 38.31% 11 18 21
North Dakota 60.92% 65.49% 60.62% 25 29 2
Ohio 58.48% 69.13% 33.34% 29 27 34
Oklahoma 43.58% 43
Oregon 62.65% 81.43% 32.22% 20 6 35
Pennsylvania 70.97% 79.03% 37.43% 10 9 24
Rhode Island 85.31% 1
South Carolina 73.17% 60.97% 37.17% 7 35 26
South Dakota 61.03% 74.88% 61.95% 23 16 1
Tennessee 56.96% 70.2% 38.51% 33 23 20
Texas 59.5% 71.54% 38.8% 28 20 19
Utah 39.65% 51.45% 44 37
Vermont 74.85% 69.52% 4 26
Virginia 76.63% 62.57% 45.16% 3 31 9
Washington 58.47% 81.57% 44.61% 30 5 11
West Virginia 54.93% 36
Wisconsin 68.39% 70.04% 49.29% 16 24 5
Wyoming 44.77% 10
National Student Clearinghouse Research Center

What do you think?

  • Joseph Brzezinski

    How many graduates actually stay in Connecticut after graduation? Also CT claims to have the most highly educated population in the country. What proportion are CT natives or CT higher educated?

    • Andrew Ba Tran

      Not sure if there’s an overall dataset tracking where graduates move to. Some colleges try to keep track of their alums so that might be out there somewhere. IPEDs has data on out-of-state versus local enrollment but I don’t think they break it out by grades. http://nces.ed.gov/datatools/index.asp?DataToolSectionID=4

  • Joseph Brzezinski

    Is there any evidence of “social promotion” in college graduation statistics? In a recent program, Bill Maher quoted Yale statistics saying in 1960, 10% got A’s and now 62% get them.

    • Andrew Ba Tran

      That’s tough data to get. This guy seems to be aggregating what he can find but they’re from different sources: News articles or what people email him or what he can find via search. Who knows how accurate they are. http://www.gradeinflation.com/ (table at the bottom)