In 10 years, one in five Connecticut residents will be older than 65

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Analysts project that in 10 years, at least 20 percent of Connecticut residents will be older than 65.

Among the contributing factors are longer life expectancies and the large baby boom generation, but these projections are nothing unexpected: Right now, one in three residents is older than 50 — and the passage of time will mean that, by 2025, almost every Connecticut town will have one in five residents over 65.

This is from an interactive report by Connecticut’s Legislative Commission on Aging and the CT Data Collaborative, which explores how the Connecticut population is projected to age. Among the key findings:

  • From 2010 to 2040, the over-65 population is projected to grow 57 percent. Meanwhile, the 20 to 64 population is projected to grow just 2 percent.
  • Connecticut has the third-highest life expectancy of any state in the nation, at 80.8 years.
  • The northwest and southeast corners of the state are already quite old.

TrendCT explored the aging population a few weeks ago. Orlando Rodriguez, who managed the population projection study in 2007, told TrendCT, “Our fertility rates are low, and we don’t have enough children in Connecticut to replace our population. We need in-migration, and when we have in-migration, they go to the cities where there are jobs. We mostly have people leaving because there are no jobs.”

Among the most interesting charts in the commission’s report is one showing the current age breakdown of Connecticut residents, which is at the top of this post. Currently, there are large peaks of residents between 35 and 44. But the chart allows you to see how these age groups are projected to change every 10 years until 2040, which allows the reader to see how this group of people will contribute to the 65-and-over population in the next 30 years.

Go to the full report to see more charts, graphs and maps.

What do you think?

  • Luther Weeks

    We should know the data and understand the implications and prepare. Many articles claim that lots of seniors is a huge problem, while seemingly an equal number lament the issues of seniors leaving the state for Florida etc. Like most trends there are good and bad implications – more senior services needed, yet taxpayers without education expense.

    • alvinschang

      Good point. You’re giving me ideas for a future post…

  • julie greenblue

    Connecticut is ranked dead last of all 50 states in which to retire (AARP, FORBES) and is ranked number one of all 50 states from which its citizens are fleeing to relocate to other states.
    IT IS RANKED AS HAVING THE MOST CORRUPT AND PREDATORY PROBATE / ELDER LAW RACKET OF ALL 50 STATES, AND NO ONE WITH ASSETS IS SAFE IN CT,
    AS A PROBATE JUDGE, PER SLEFCOMPOSED CT PROBATE “LAW’ CAN AND OFTEN DOES OVERRIDE A LEGITIMATE MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS OF MENTAL COMPETANCY AND CAN THEN DECLARE ANYONE SO TARGETED AS INCOMPETANT,
    THEREBY STRIPPING THE PERSON, (STATE RESIDENT OR OUT OF STATE VISITOR), OF ALL CONSTITUTIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS AND SEIZING THEIR ASSETS.
    UNBELIEVABLE AS IT MAY SEEM, IT IS TRUE AND IT IS HAPPENING EVERY DAY IN CORRUP-TICUT TO SENIORS WHO HAPPEN TO BE PRESENT IN THIS STATE, RESIDENT OR NOT..
    GET OUT, GET OUT GET OUT OF THIS FILTHY CORRUPT STATE……

    • 00000000001

      And the elderly in Connecticut have among the most crushing state/local tax burdens in the nation, especially with many elderly paying 20%, of their income to the property tax. The current property tax breaker is meager. The wealthy pay far less in taxes, as a percentage of their income. Those who run state government believe that more regressive the tax system, the better they zing it to the non-wealthy, the better the Connecticut tax system looks to business and the rich. Massachusetts, whose tax system is less regressive than Connecticut’s, ranks #24 in business environment while Connecticut ranks #42 in business environment, and may I also add that Massachusetts grew by 2.3% while Connecticut grew by 0.6 percent. This is a snapshot of our underachieving Connecticut officials. The conservative leaning Tax Foundation has done the business rankings.