Younger CT women shift toward degrees in sciences, away from education

Younger people are earning bachelor’s degrees in education at a far lower rate than older age groups, and gender gaps in science and engineering have narrowed, new Census data show. Nationwide, just 8.9 percent of 25- to 39-year-olds with bachelor’s degrees studied education, compared with 12.7 percent of 40- to 64-year-olds and 23.5 percent of people aged 65 and older, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 American Community Survey five-year estimates.

Advocacy group report points to cost as housing hurdle

Connecticut has made strides in reducing homelessness and increasing its affordable housing stock, but affordability remains a challenge for a state with the sixth-highest housing costs in the nation, according to an update from the Partnership for Strong Communities, a non-profit housing advocacy group.

Health care law subsidy averages $357 per month in CT

The federal health law pays an estimated $346 million per year in insurance premiums on behalf of Connecticut residents — dollars that will be at stake as lawmakers debate a repeal of the Affordable Care Act. For individual Connecticut customers, that amounts to an average of $357 in premium subsidies per month, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Undocumented immigrants in Connecticut declined in 2014

The number of undocumented immigrants living in Connecticut declined by about 10,000 in 2014 to 120,000, according to an analysis recently released by the Pew Research Center.

The number of foreigners living in the state without proper documentation climbed from 20,000 in 1990 to a peak in of 130,000 2008 and had remained level through 2013.

Connecticut saw a drop in reports of hate crime incidents in 2015

The election of Donald Trump as the nation’s 45th president has been followed by a wave of reports of racially and ethnically motivated acts of intimidation and hatred both nationwide and in Connecticut, but spotty law enforcement data could limit our ability to fully understand the subject.

Connecticut students better than average at repaying college loans

Students taking on federal student loans to attend Connecticut schools do about the same or better at repaying that debt than students at schools across the country, but the type of school makes a difference. Nationwide, schools had an average default rate — the percentage of borrowers in the repayment phase who are in default — of about about 10.7 percent in fiscal year 2013.